Earthquake Fault

  • The Earthquake Fault is actually an impressive fissure in the underlying rock, as narrow as 10 feet and as deep as 60 feet, running north-south across Hwy. 203 toward Earthquake Dome through some of the oldest trees in the region. Look closely at the edges of the “fault,” and you’ll see that the sides of the rock - now 6 to 10 feet apart - fit together perfectly. The fissure opened around 550 to 650 years ago, during a time of intense volcanic activity that included steam blasts at Inyo Craters and eruptions at Deadman, Obsidian, and Glass Creek domes. Early pioneers collected ice here in summertime for the making of ice cream. There are picnic tables, parking, restrooms and walking trails.

  • The Earthquake Fault is actually an impressive fissure in the underlying rock, as narrow as 10 feet and as deep as 60 feet, running north-south across Hwy. 203 toward Earthquake Dome through some of the oldest trees in the region. Look closely at the edges of the “fault,” and you’ll see that the sides of the rock - now 6 to 10 feet apart - fit together perfectly. The fissure opened around 550 to 650 years ago, during a time of intense volcanic activity that included steam blasts at Inyo Craters and eruptions at Deadman, Obsidian, and Glass Creek domes. Early pioneers collected ice here in summertime for the making of ice cream. There are picnic tables, parking, restrooms and walking trails.

Destination Alerts

  • 05/24/2017: Thanks to the drought busting winter of 2017, trails above 8500 ft are covered in snow. Watch for snow, ice, and high water.

Reviews

Submit a review

Related Trails

Related Trails

Trail Length (mi) Surface Activities and Services
Earthquake Fault Trail 0.2 Mixed Hiking
Mountain View Trail 5.3 Soil Mountain Biking

Related Experiences

Related Experiences

Experience Rating Length (mi) Surface Duration
Self Guided Tour at Earthquake Fault 0.3 Mixed Less than 4 hours
How to get involved Local recreation resources Experiences and ratings Finding your way around the MLTS